Two Ohio parents who do not get along often have a nightmare situation when trying to come to a fair custody agreement. When they are not willing to work together, the court has to intervene to determine a child custody resolution. Kate and Jon Gosselin are back in the news and will be going back to court for a child custody decision on their son, Collin.

The former couple made headlines several years ago when Jon claimed Kate had placed Collin in a facility for children with special needs, not only without Jon’s consent but also not letting him know the location of the facility. Jon filed for custody of Collin in October, with his attorneys claiming it was in the boy’s best interests to be released into Jon’s care when Collin was able to leave the facility. During a recent father/son visitation, an observer claimed the boy seemed to be happy to be with his dad.

Jon was awarded custody of another of the sextuplets, Hannah, several months ago. Kate had tried to fight the court’s ruling for Hannah’s custody but did not file the paperwork in time. There has been nothing publicly released on Jon’s attempt to get custody of any of the other children. The oldest twins are now 18 and can make the choice for themselves whether or not to spend time with their father, although past news accounts reveal the three of them do not have the best relationship.

A fair child custody agreement is not difficult to attain when both parents keep their focus on what is best for the child. However, it seems more often than not that at least one parent cares more about getting his or her own way. When an Ohio ex is choosing to foster contention instead of compatibility, an attorney can impart valuable legal information without bias to the situation and be the client’s voice in the courtroom.