Some men who become fathers as a result of a spontaneous, brief liaison will often deny the possibility of their parental status. Thus, child custody and support are issues they attempt to avoid. Professional football fans in Ohio might be interested to know that cornerback for the Washington Redskins, Josh Norman, is all for a shared child custody agreement for his daughter, born earlier this year.

Norman and the baby’s mother, Melody Woods, were not in a committed relationship when she got pregnant. Norman did not even know he was the father until he received the results of a DNA test. Woods claimed Norman did not want to be in his daughter’s life and had filed for sole physical and legal custody. Norman has refuted her claim and has responded with his own plan for shared custody.

The visitation schedule Norman has outlined has been developed around his seasonal athletic agenda, with help from family members. As far as financial support, he has no problem paying nearly $6,000 each month and feels that amount should be more than enough to provide for all the child needs in this stage of her life. Woods is pushing for an amount based on Norman’s income.

A child custody dispute between parents who are no longer together does not have to be contentious. When both parties choose to put the needs of the child first, finding common ground on which to build an acceptable and reasonable arrangement should be uncomplicated. An Ohio attorney well acquainted with state laws can answer any questions parents may have when preparing for their child’s future.